About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“Our Christian people regard with great joy everything that contributes to the splendor of the ceremonies. Jesus—who was poor in His private life—received ointment on His feet. See Thomas Aquinas (Prima Secundae, q. 102, art. 5, ad 10) and the holy Curé of Ars. The Church has always loved beautiful churches, and so forth. We must preserve our sacred patrimony and make sure sacred objects do not become secular possessions.”
— Abbot & Council Father denouncing “noble simplicity” during Vatican II

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Sensational Hymn for St. Joseph … with Modern Polyphony!
published 6 July 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

Y CHOIR GREATLY ENJOYS singing Mercier’s CANONIC GLORIA, which uses the Editio Vaticana version of Gloria III as a canon between men and women. Mercier’s luxuriant modern harmonies never get old, melding perfectly with the ancient plainsong. In the footnote section, I mentioned the “in house” collection where I found that Gloria.

The following hymn comes from that same book, except Mercier appears to have chosen a French variant instead of the Vaticana melody. 1

I attempted to record the vocal lines myself—to give a rough idea how this piece sounds—but just remember I’m a baritone! These harmonies were meant to be sung by a full choir:

    * *  PDF “CAELITUM JOSEPH” by Raphaël Mercier (d. 1953)


REHEARSAL VIDEOS :

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

SOPRANO : YouTube   •   Audio

ALTO : YouTube   •   Audio

TENOR : YouTube   •   Audio

BASS : YouTube   •   Audio

Organists can teach the chant melody using this score.

Or they can print the Lower Key for training purposes.


Our priest has a special devotion to St. Joseph, so we’ll be singing this piece a lot at our FSSP Apostolate here in Los Angeles.



NOTES FROM THIS ARTICLE:

1   For the record, neither does it correspond to Mocquereau’s 1903 Liber Usualis. In that book, Mocquereau chose a “Renaissance” variant which matches the one chosen by polyphonic composers such as Fr. Victoria (†1611) and Fr. Asola (†1609).