About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“…it would be a very praiseworthy thing and the correction would be so easy to make that one could accommodate the chant by gradual changes; and through this it would not lose its original form, since it is only through the binding together of many notes put under short syllables that they become long without any good purpose when it would be sufficient to give one note only.”
— Zarlino (1558) anticipating the Medicæa

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The Man Who Thrice Rejected Knighthood
published 15 November 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

OR AS LONG AS I CAN REMEMBER, my favorite movie has been “A Man For All Seasons,” which—although religious—won admiration from an astonishing array of secular film critics. Much could be said about this marvelous production, which is based on a play by Robert Bolt (d. 1995), who helped adapt it in 1966 for film. The play itself doesn’t always stick to the facts, but can still be considered generally speaking historically accurate. The film’s soundtrack is fabulous.

This brief YouTube describes how Paul Scofield changed what is undoubtedly the film’s pivotal line:


In 1966 The film won six (6) Oscars at the 39th Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Actor. It also won other major awards.

…yet Paul Scofield, who thrice rejected knighthood, did not accept his Oscar in person, as the YouTube above explains.