About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and six children.
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“In spite of what it is currently called, the music of these songs is not modern: this musical style is not new, but has been played in the most profane places and surroundings (cabarets, music halls, often for more or less lascivious dances with foreign names). The people are led on to rock or swing. They all feel an urge to dance about. That sort of “body language” is certainly alien to our Western culture, unfavorable to contemplation and its origins are rather suspect. Most of the time our congregations, which already find it hard not to confuse the crochets and the quavers in a 6/8 bar, do not respect the rhythm; then one no longer feels like dancing, but with the rhythm gone to pieces, the habitual poorness of the melodic line becomes all the more noticeable.”
— Unnamed choirmaster (Northern France) circa 1986

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Catena Legionis in Gregorian Chant
published 16 September 2017 by Veronica Brandt

Legio Mariae HE LEGION OF MARY is a treasure trove for students of Latin. They have adapted many Roman symbols and ideas into a Catholic organization ready to take over the world.

Most of the Legionaries’ prayers are made up of the Rosary, but after that comes the Catena or chain, made up of the Magnificat with an Antiphon from the Song of Songs:

Who is she who cometh forth as the morning rising, fair as the moon, bright as the sun, terrible as an army set in battle array.

They conclude this part with the Collect from the Mass of Our Lady Mediatrix of All Graces.

So, for someone coming from a background of Sung Vespers, this is a prayer crying out to be sung!

    * *  Catena Legionis PDF : 4 A5 pages – print 2up for a booklet

And here is a quick recording of the antiphon to get you started reading the music.