About this blogger:
Andrew Leung is a seminarian for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Steubenville, Ohio. He has served as Director of Music at St. Pius X Church (Atlanta) and taught Gregorian chant at the Cistercian Monastery of the Holy Spirit (Georgia). For two years, he will be studying in Macau, China.
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"Upon the road, René was always occupied with God. His words and the discourses he held were all expressive of submission to the commands of Divine Providence, and showed a willing acceptance of the death which God was sending him. He gave himself to God as a sacrifice, to be reduced to ashes by the fires of the Iroquois, which that good Father's hand would kindle. He sought the means to bless Him in all things and everywhere. Covered with wounds as he himself was, Goupil dressed the wounds of other persons, of the enemies who had received some blows in the fight as well as those of the prisoners. He opened the vein for a sick Iroquois. And he did it all with as much charity as if he had done it to persons who were his best friends."
— St. Isaac Jogues (writing in 1643)

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Video • Sacred or Secular?
published 22 February 2016 by Andrew Leung

JUST SAW this video on Facebook shared by American composer, Frank La Rocca. I am not sure if he made the video, but it is pretty interesting. The video, Sacred or Secular? What do you hear?, was uploaded to Vimeo by “Phantom of the Choir Loft”. This video summarizes the fundamental Church teachings on Sacred Music and explains why Gregorian chant is the model of Sacred Music. What is interesting is that inappropriate “church songs” are being played as background music through the 8-minutes-long video. While the caption shows what true Sacred Music is, the audio, on the other hand, demonstrates what should not be considered Sacred Music.



“Phantom of the Choir Loft” also uploaded another interesting video called What Hollywood Understands and Many Catholic Parishes Don’t About Music. It compares the Hollywood filmmakers’ musical approaches to Jesus’s Incarnation and Passion to some contemporary Catholic composers’ approaches.