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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“I grew up listening to Lessons & Carols from Cambridge and that was Advent-Christmas for me. Then I moved to Rome and discovered Rorate Masses, the Novena of the Immaculate Conception with the Tota Pulchra, the Christmas Novena, the O Antiphons, the Aspiciens, the Rorate Coeli, the Alma Redemptoris Mater: that's Advent for me now. I am glad to see seminarians all over the United States doing Lessons & Carols, but are they learning our ancient Roman traditions alongside a 20th-century Anglican one?”
— Rev. Christopher Smith

Restoring A Sense of the Sacred to the Mass
published 12 November 2014 by Fr. David Friel

F YOU HAVEN’T taken notice yet of the great things happening over at One Peter Five, you should. Only a few months into their blog, their extensive pool of contributors has already posted a great number of interesting articles in various fields related to the life of the Church.

One article, in particular, will interest readers of Views from the Choir Loft. It’s title is “Restoring a Sense of the Sacred to the Mass.” The piece is written by Brian Williams, a convert who is raising his family in North Carolina and whose work is also available on his own blog (LiturgyGuy.com).

This encouraging article highlights the resurging focus we are experiencing on three crucial aspects of reverent liturgy: Latin, chant, and incense. This is a very simple recipe for reviving sacrality in our worship. Here is a look at the opening of Williams’ article:

In October 1966, less than a year after the conclusion of the Second Vatican Council, philosopher and eminent Catholic theologian Dietrich Von Hildebrand asked whether or not we are better prepared to “meet Christ in the Mass by soaring up to Him, or by dragging Him down into our own pedestrian, workaday world” (The Case for the Latin Mass, Triumph Magazine, October 1966). For nearly fifty years the Church has been struggling to address this question. . . . In the ongoing effort to recover this “mystical element” within the liturgy, the Church has been returning to such venerable practices as the use of Latin, chant and incense during the Holy Mass. Establishing a sense of awe through such tangible means has also helped to diminish the anthropocentric tendency so prevalent in the post-conciliar liturgy.

Read the whole article here: Restoring a Sense of the Sacred to the Mass.

I look forward to reading much more from the authors over at One Peter Five!