About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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“Philip the presbyter and legate of the Apostolic See said: There is no doubt, and in fact it has been known in all ages, that the holy and most blessed Peter, prince and head of the apostles, pillar of the faith, and foundation of the Catholic Church, received the keys of the kingdom from our Lord Jesus Christ, the Savior and Redeemer of the human race, and that to him was given the power of loosing and binding sins: who down even to today and forever both lives and judges in his successors. The holy and most blessed pope Celestine, according to due order, is his successor and holds his place, and us he sent to supply his place in this holy synod.”
— Council of Ephesus (A.D. 431)

In Search Of Polyphonic Recordings By Good Choirs
published 25 May 2013 by Jeff Ostrowski

I am looking to add a few CDs to my collection of Renaissance polyphony recordings. Can you help me? Here are the criteria:

1. Must have been composed between 1530 and 1600.

If most of the pieces on the recording are between those dates, we’re good!

2. No instruments, please.

Just FYI, I’ve heard all the arguments for and against accompanying Renaissance polyphony with instruments.

3. Lesser known pieces and composers would be appreciated.

I don’t desire another recording of Palestrina’s Missa Papae Marcelli.

4. Really, really good choirs.

If possible, no amateur choirs. Thanks!

5. Please don’t say Tallis Scholars.

While I admire many things about the Tallis Scholars, many of their recordings sound “top heavy” to my ears. In other words, the soprano lines are way out of proportion with the other voices. My concept of “polyphony” is that all the voices are more or less equal. I don’t like when the soprano section predominates. Somebody told me the director of the Tallis Scholars is married to one of the main soprano singers, but I’ve never been able to verify this. If true, maybe that explains it.

6. Don’t be shy!

Please let me know your suggestions in the combox below. Thanks! I owe you one!