About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“If the right is given to African tribes to include their pagan traditions in the liturgy, I think the same should also be given to the rite of a thousand year-old Christian Church, based on a much older Roman tradition.”
— Professor László Dobszay

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Brébeuf Hymn #517 • “Veni Redemptor Gentium”
published 24 July 2019 by Jeff Ostrowski

In the Brébeuf Hymnal, the famous Advent text “Veni Redemptor Gentium” is used with several melodies. Here is an example, recorded by a young lady in 8th grade:

You can hear the individual tracks if you visit the Brébeuf website and scroll to #517.

“O Heiland Reiss” is a famous Advent melody—and the Brébeuf Hymnal uses that melody with several different texts, including an English translation of “O Heiland Reiss” by an FSSP priest. Catholic hymnals often use this melody with various texts, and here are several examples:

    * *  O Heiland reiss die Himmel auf • Pope Pius XII Hymnal (1959)

    * *  O Heiland reiss die Himmel auf • Catholic Hymnal (1957)

    * *  O Heiland reiss die Himmel auf • Catholic Hymnal (1936)

    * *  O Heiland reiss die Himmel auf • Catholic Hymnal (1910)

    * *  O Heiland reiss die Himmel auf • Catholic Hymnal (1885)

    * *  O Heiland reiss die Himmel auf • Catholic Hymnal (1989)

(“O Heiland Reiss” is the tune you hear in the video above.)

Over the next few months, we hope to explain why such flexibility—of texts and tunes—is crucial.