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Ordained in 2011, Father Friel served for five years as Parochial Vicar at St. Anselm Parish in Northeast Philly. He is currently studying toward an STL in sacred liturgy at The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C.
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“The problem of the new Missal resides in its departure from the continuous history which was going on before and after Pius V, and that it creates definitely a new book (although with old material). Its appearance is accompanied by a type of prohibition of what was traditional, being such a type of prohibition alien to the ecclesiastical history of law and of liturgy. From my personal knowledge of the conciliar debates and from the repeated reading of the speeches of the Fathers of the Council, I can say with certainty, that this was not intended by them.”
— Cardinal Ratzinger, Letter to Wolfgang Waldstein (14 December 1976)

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Knowledge of the Infant Lord
published 10 December 2017 by Fr. David Friel

MARVELOUS line from St. Therese of Lisieux graced the front of a Christmas card I once received: “A God Who became so small could only be mercy and love.”

That wise remark from the saint of the Little Way caused me to think of all the characteristics of God we can know simply from looking to our Infant Lord. Numerous words came to mind. Here are some of them:

Mercy. Love. Humility. Peace. Life. Joy. Sacrifice. Subtle. Captivating. Real. Inviting. Youth. Curiosity. Hope. Spirit. Power. Glory. Strength. Weakness. Truth. Goodness. Beauty.

It is astonishing to me that King Herod felt threatened by the coming Messiah. How could a grown man be afraid of a Baby—even a Baby Who possessed all the powers of the world? A thousand years earlier, another king, David, expressed it thus: “The Lord is my light & my salvation; whom shall I fear? The Lord is the protector of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?” (Ps. 27:1).

That God would become so small testifies to Whom He is. Yet, who are we to have this insight into His nature, much less to benefit from His extraordinary gift of Self? In the words of St. Augustine of Hippo: “Ask if this were merited; ask for its reason, for its justification, and see whether you will find any other answer but sheer grace.”