About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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“Church officials frequently asked Tomás Luis de Victoria for his opinion on cathedral appointments because of his fame and knowledge. He was faithful to his position as convent organist even after his professional debut as an organist, and never accepted any extra pay for being a chapelmaster. Held in great esteem, his contract allowed him frequent travel away from the convent, and he attended Palestrina's funeral (in Rome) in 1594.”
— Dr. Robert Stevenson, 1961 (mod.)

Dazzling Canon • “Adoremus in Aeternum”
published 23 April 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

OPE SAINT JOHN PAUL II wrote famously on 22 November 2003: “Regarding liturgical music, I make my own the rule of Saint Pius X: The more closely a composition for church approaches in its movement, inspiration, and savor the Gregorian melodic form, the more sacred and liturgical it becomes; and the more out of harmony it is with that supreme model, the less worthy it is of the temple.”

A perfect example is the following contrafactum, in which Guerrero brilliantly transforms a Gregorian melody (“Beata Mater”) into a canon between Soprano and Alto:

    * *  PDF Download • “Adorémus in Aetérnum” (Guerrero)


EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

SOPRANO : YouTube   •   Audio

ALTO : YouTube   •   Audio

TENOR : YouTube   •   Audio

BASS : YouTube   •   Audio

A discussion about this post is underway.