About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“Philip the presbyter and legate of the Apostolic See said: There is no doubt, and in fact it has been known in all ages, that the holy and most blessed Peter, prince and head of the apostles, pillar of the faith, and foundation of the Catholic Church, received the keys of the kingdom from our Lord Jesus Christ, the Savior and Redeemer of the human race, and that to him was given the power of loosing and binding sins: who down even to today and forever both lives and judges in his successors. The holy and most blessed pope Celestine, according to due order, is his successor and holds his place, and us he sent to supply his place in this holy synod.”
— Council of Ephesus (A.D. 431)

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Is Renaissance Music Too Expressive For Holy Mass?
published 20 July 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

ANY GREAT COMPOSERS have set the “Salve Regina.” The version by Tomás Luis de Victoria (d. 1611) is among the finest. In the following excerpt—recorded on YouTube by an excellent group called Genesis Sixteen—consider his gorgeous treatment of the Latin text:

Ad te suspirámus, geméntes et flentes in hac lacrimárum valle.
To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this valley of tears.

Victoria uses typical Renaissance “tricks.” For tears, the lugubrious flats are added. Moreover, the mournful descending lines in each voice—one after another—bring home the “sad valley” concept. Sing each “lacrimárum valle” as the music plays:

    * *  Mp3 Excerpt • “Salve Regina” (Genesis Sixteen)

493 Lacrimarum Valle Victoria


It just doesn’t get any better than this, folks!