About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“Oh, the happy choir director who is hired to start work on a brand new choir, or who walks into his first rehearsal a total stranger to the existing group—what a fortunate man he is! The new choir director who is a former member of the choir, or a member of the congregation, or the nephew of the alto soloist, or a former altar boy, or otherwise well acquainted with the choir, is in for a few headaches.”
— Paul Hume (1956)

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Polyphonic “Alleluia” for 3 voices • Morales (†1553)
published 24 April 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

876 manuscript HILE STUDYING musicology in graduate school, I made a series of recordings for a choral methods class. I was attempting to demonstrate—by means of choir recordings—that ladies with low voices and men with high voices mixed together create a beautiful “choral blend.” I have always believed it’s a mistake to have all women in the alto section and all men in the tenor section.

If you attempt this lovely “ALLELUIA” based on a score by Cristóbal de Morales (†1553), you might consider placing high-voiced males with low-voiced females together on the middle line:

    * *  PDF Download • Polyphonic Alleluia (Morales)

REHEARSAL FILES :

EQUAL VOICE : YouTube   •   Mp3 File

HIGHEST VOICE : YouTube   •   Mp3 File

MIDDLE VOICE : YouTube   •   Mp3 File

LOWEST VOICE : YouTube   •   Mp3 File