About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
"Since such is the nature of man that he cannot easily without external means be raised to meditation on divine things, on that account holy Mother Church has instituted certain rites, namely that certain things be pronounced in a subdued tone (canon and words of consecration) and others in a louder tone; she has likewise made use of ceremonies such as mystical blessings, lights, incense, vestments, and many other things of this kind in accordance with apostolic teaching and tradition, whereby both the majesty of so great a sacrifice might be commended, and the minds of the faithful excited by these visible signs of religion and piety to the contemplation of the most sublime matters which are hidden in this sacrifice."
— Council of Trent (Session XXII)

ABOUT US  |  HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
How To Sing The Gregorian Alleluia
published 15 May 2014 by Jeff Ostrowski

510 Alleluia UTSIDE OF EASTERTIDE, the Alleluia is easy enough to sing. The “Alleluia” is sung, up until the asterisk. Then, the complete Alleluia is sung. The verse follows, and the “Alleluia” is repeated in its entirety.

This method creates something like this:

ALLELUIA (1/2)
ALLELUIA (complete)
— VERSE
ALLELUIA (complete)

By the way, this same method is also used for the very first week of Easter (confusing, no?).

* *  However, during Eastertide, the method changes, since there’s now a Lesser Alleluia and Greater Alleluia. During Eastertide, here is the method for the 1st Alleluia (sometimes called the “Lesser Alleluia”):

LESSER ALLELUIA: Alleluia is sung up until the asterisk. Then, the entire Alleluia is repeated. Then the verse is sung.

This method creates something like this:

ALLELUIA (1/2)
ALLELUIA (complete)
— VERSE

And, for the 2nd Alleluia (sometimes called the “Greater Alleluia”):

GREATER ALLELUIA: Alleluia is sung all the way through. The verse is sung. The Alleluia is sung all the way through.

This method creates something like this:

ALLELUIA (complete)
— VERSE
ALLELUIA (complete)

If you don’t think my explanation was clear, you can read Dom Johner or the Vatican Preface. However, some people get confused by these, as the wording is not totally clear.

Incidentally, after the Second Vatican Council, the method of singing the Alleluia was changed somewhat, but it is still allowed to use the traditional method.