About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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The liturgical reform bears absolutely no relation to what is called "desacralization" and in no way intends to lend support to the phenomenon of "secularizing the world." Accordingly the rites must retain their dignity, spirit of reverence, and sacred character.
— Sacred Congregation for Divine Worship (5 September 1970)

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“Chanted Angelus” • Where does it come from?
published 2 August 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

ACK in 2010, I released this lovely version of the ANGELUS in Latin—which was a favorite of my high school students—on the CMAA forum. Since that time, I’ve been astonished by the number of times it has been downloaded and recorded by people across the globe:

    * *  PDF Booklet • THE ANGELUS (Dom Charpentier, OSB)

But did Dom Charpentier, OSB, truly compose it?

The melodic pattern is quite common in the Gregorian repertoire and would have been known even in the “decadent ages” of Gregorian chant (circa 1700). However, I recently came across this ancient manuscript:

4743 Charpentier ANGELUS source


This implies that Dom Charpentier created his rendition based on an ancient model.