About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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When Christ gave the bread, he did not say, "This is the symbol of my body," but, "This is my body." In the same way, when he gave the cup of his blood he did not say, "This is the symbol of my blood," but, "This is my blood."
— Theodore, Bishop of Mopsuestia, writing in the 5th Century

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New Gloria Mixing Plainsong w/ Polyphony
published 14 June 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

HE FOLLOWING SETTING did not exist before yesterday night, so technically it’s “new.” However, all I did was apply falsobordone from Lodovico da Viadana (d. 1627) to GLORIA IX—so it’s not really new. For centuries, plainsong (“without meter”) was mixed with polyphony (“mensural music”), but these days it’s not as common. I recorded the voice parts, to help my choir learn—but it will sound better with a full choir, and we currently have about 35 singers.

The polyphony begins at the 0:37 mark:

    * *  PDF Download • Viadana Falsobordone w/ Plainsong


REHEARSAL VIDEOS :


EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

SOPRANO : YouTube   •   Audio

ALTO : YouTube   •   Audio

QUINTUS : YouTube   •   Audio

TENOR : YouTube   •   Audio

BASS : YouTube   •   Audio


Before using this piece, teach your choir GLORIA IX. You can download the score for your singers, and—to help them learn—consider this organ accompaniment by Flor Peeters:

    * *  PDF Download • Organ Accompaniment by Flor Peeters

I love Flor Peeters very much, and his accompaniment is fine—but it’s not his best. Perhaps he was in a hurry!