About this blogger:
Andrew Leung is a seminarian for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Steubenville, Ohio. He has served as Director of Music at St. Pius X Church (Atlanta) and taught Gregorian chant at the Cistercian Monastery of the Holy Spirit (Georgia). For two years, he will be studying in Macau, China.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
Certainly, the Second Vatican Council wished to promote greater active participation [and] fine initiatives were taken along these lines. However we cannot close our eyes to the disaster, the devastation and the schism that the modern promoters of a living liturgy caused by remodeling the Church’s liturgy according to their ideas. They forgot that the liturgical act is not just a PRAYER, but also and above all a MYSTERY in which something is accomplished for us that we cannot fully understand but that we must accept and receive in faith, love, obedience and adoring silence.
— Pope Francis' Chief Liturgist (31 March 2017)

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Free Downloads • Works by Cardinal Bartolucci (Part 2)
published 7 April 2016 by Andrew Leung

CTL Cardinal Bartolucci Website BOUT TWO MONTHS AGO, I wrote a post about the late Domenico Cardinal Bartolucci and his choral works. Recently, I discovered an organization called the Domenico Bartolucci Foundation. The foundation was started in Rome in June 2003 by a group of admirers of the most recent Perpetual Director of the Sistine Chapel Choir. The main purpose of the institution is to promote and develop the knowledge and diffusion of the Maestro’s music.

The foundation has a website in both English and Italian. This website is a wonderful resource for Catholic church musicians! Under the “publications” tab, you can find CDs and collections of his works published in many books and you can order them online. Many of his works are also available for download. These free PDF files include many of Cardinal Bartolucci’s motets, settings of the propers, a few Masses and orchestral works.

I would like to recommend these two pieces below: the Maestro’s setting of O Sacrum Convivium composed in a modern style and his Ave Maria modeled after the renaissance polyphonic style. The melodies of both motets are based on the original Gregorian melodies. You can download the score for both pieces for free on the foundation’s website. Enjoy!

O Sacrum Convivium


Ave Maria