About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“Every experienced choirmaster’s work is founded on the following three axioms: (1) Few boys have a really good natural voice; (2) No boy is able to control his voice and produce good tone without training; (3) Most boys have a good ear, and considerable imitative capacity. It is on the last of these axioms that the choirmaster must begin his work.”
— Sir Richard Runciman Terry (1912)

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Strong Vibrato • What Do You Think?
published 5 April 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

USICIANS AGREE ON VERY LITTLE. (Full stop.) However, when it comes to vibrato, most agree that “straight tone” becomes desirable the further back you go (Renaissance, Medieval, and so forth) whereas a more prominent vibrato becomes appropriate the closer you get to—let’s say—Giuseppe Verdi.

In my view, a controlled “tight” vibrato can be quite a beautiful thing:


On the other hand, too much vibrato can obscure the melodic line and become quite distracting. (It can even become the “u” word.) Do you agree the lady on the left pushes the envelope?


What do you think of a strong vibrato? Specifically, in the context of choral music?

If you plan to use the CCW Facebook combox, please include specific videos—that way, we can know exactly what you’re talking about.