About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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"In the place of liturgy as the fruit of development came fabricated liturgy. We abandoned the organic, living process of growth and development over centuries, and replaced it—as in a manufacturing process—with a fabrication, a banal on-the-spot product."
— Pope Benedict XVI, describing the postconciliar liturgical reforms

Solesmes Monastery & Latin Accents
published 10 June 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

RECENTLY cited a Latin word whose accent determines the meaning. Solesmes always includes the accent, but at some point they decided to start including accents on words of two syllables, which is almost never done. I don’t know what prompted this decision, and they are inconsistent about this:

642 Solesmes Accents

I suspect that in a long melisma it’s hard to know “where you are” so it makes sense to place an accent on a word of two syllables. However—as I mentioned already—this is almost never done, because everybody knows that in Latin words with two syllables the accent goes on the first (except for Hebrew words).

It just feels odd to write Déus. Do people really think it could be Deús? Or maybe I need to realize that not everyone was blessed to have good teachers like I was.

Could it be that the Solesmes editions had begun to spread into countries whose language was not derived from Latin? They would probably appreciate accent marks on two-syllable words.

Another example of inconsistency:

636 hyphen

Another example of inconsistency:

615 accents

This one, as well:

564 accent

Look at the inconsistency between 1926 and 1955 on the words OMNEM and SUPER:

    * *  PDF Download • Case in Point