About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“In 1854 John Mason Neale co-founded an order of women dedicated to nursing the sick. Many Anglicans in his day, however, were very suspicious of anything suggestive of Roman Catholicism. Only nine years earlier, John Henry Newman had encouraged Catholic practices in Anglican churches and had ended up becoming a Roman Catholic. This encouraged the suspicion that anyone such as Neale was an agent of the Vatican, assigned to destroy Anglicanism by subverting it from within. Once, Neale was attacked and mauled at a funeral of one of the Sisters. From time to time unruly crowds threatened to stone him or to burn his house.”
— Unknown Source

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Organ Accompaniment • “Christe Supreme”
published 23 August 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

RECENTLY posted a polyphonic REFRAIN and paired it with a Gregorian hymn. Some choirs will not be able to sing the polyphony right away—or perhaps ever—but can still sing the Gregorian hymn. Here’s an organ accompaniment modulating into a higher key for the final verse:

    * *  ORGANIST “Christe Supreme”

Believe it or not, this Gregorian melody gave us the Solfège names: DO RE MI FA SOL LA. Originally, they called “Do” as “Ut.” I don’t know when or why they decided to change “Ut” into “Do.” If you google “Ut queant laxis,” you can learn more about why this hymn gave us Solfège. The French don’t use Solfège, by the way. They prefer numbers.