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"That good youth, recognizing the dangers in which he was involving himself in so perilous a journey, declared at his departure that the desire of serving God was leading him into a country where he surely expected to meet death." — Fr. Jerome Lalemant, speaking of St. Jean de Lalande
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“In spite of what it is currently called, the music of these songs is not modern: this musical style is not new, but has been played in the most profane places and surroundings (cabarets, music halls, often for more or less lascivious dances with foreign names). The people are led on to rock or swing. They all feel an urge to dance about. That sort of “body language” is certainly alien to our Western culture, unfavorable to contemplation and its origins are rather suspect. Most of the time our congregations, which already find it hard not to confuse the crochets and the quavers in a 6/8 bar, do not respect the rhythm; then one no longer feels like dancing, but with the rhythm gone to pieces, the habitual poorness of the melodic line becomes all the more noticeable.”
— Unnamed choirmaster (Northern France) circa 1986

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1937 Organ Accompaniments for the Kyriale (Bragers)
published 19 March 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

km0_1937_Bragers_Organ_Accompaniment_Vatican_Kyriale HE FOLLOWING BOOK has been made available for free download courtesy of the Jean de Lalande Library. If you appreciate these efforts, please consider making a donation by using the link at the top of the page.

Here’s a PDF download — Organ Accompaniments for the Ordinarium Missæ:

      * *  1937 Organ Accompaniments for the Kyriale (Achille P. Bragers) — High Key

Click here to purchase this book for just $17.00 • Spiral-bound, 163 pages longView index.

This same book is being sold by others for $38.00!



If you need the “Low Key,” click here and order Volume 1.

ORGAN ACCOMPANIMENTSORDINARY OF THE MASS (Ordinarium Missae) • COMPLETE GREGORIAN CHANT MASSES • First published in 1937, this organ accompaniment has in modern notation all of the standard Kyriale Ordinaries (I – XVIII), the Credo versions I-VI, and the Asperges (including one ad libitum) and Vidi aquam chant. And for choirs that are not proficient enough yet to sing the propers of the Requiem Masses a cappalla, Bragers generously provided the accompaniments for their propers and Kyriale and the other funeral functions; i.e.: the entrance of the casket into the church (Subvenite), the in Exsequiis (Miserere) absolution ceremony (Libera me, responses and Benedictus), and the concluding antiphon, In Paradisum. Of course what Gregorian Chant organ accompaniment manual is complete without supplying some of the ad libitum modes for the Kyriale? Bragers succeeds here too admirably with cantus ad libitum chants for I – XI of the Kyrie, I – III and more ambrosiano of the Gloria, I – III of the Sanctus and I & II of the Agnus Dei. Throughout the entire book, the organ notation is underscored by the Latin words, hyphenated under each appropriate note (which assists with proper pronunciation of liturgical Latin, too). Fully indexed, all notations and text are in printed in black ink on medium stock paper to ensure durability, while the spacious comb-binding gives the organist easy and quick access. Kyrie, Gloria, Credo, Sanctus, Agnus Dei, Ite missa est). This is a must-have for organists who play for the Tridentine Latin Mass!

Bragers’ Kyriale contains organ accompaniments according to the Solesmes rhythmic markings.
courtesy of a generous person (A.C.)