About this blogger:
Aristotle A. Esguerra has served in the Diocese of Madison since 2009 as music director at the churches of St. Mary, Pine Bluff and St. Ignatius, Mount Horeb, and as the chant instructor to the Cistercian Nuns of Valley of Our Lady Monastery, Prairie du Sac.
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“Father Daniel’s special work during his stay at Ihonatiria was with the children. Their parents had not trained or disciplined them, they were utterly lawless and bad-tempered, but with infinite forbearance and kindliness the missionary became a favorite with them… Having taught them to sing, he proceeded to train the children to chant the Our Father, the Hail Mary, and the Commandments, which he had rendered into Huron rhymes. Formed into a choir, they added beauty and solemnity to the chapel services and attracted great numbers of their elders to Mass.”
— From the Life of Saint Antoine Daniel (d. 1648)

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A Deacon on Devotional and Liturgical Music
published 25 February 2013 by Aristotle A. Esguerra

From a deacon at the Cathedral of the Madeleine in Salt Lake City:

Unlike many of my Catholic friends, I enjoy a fair amount of contemporary Christian music. My enjoyment of such music, by no means all of it, as much of is lamentably bad, has no liturgical implications, which means I have no desire for it to comprise any part of the Sacred Liturgy. But for devotional purposes, I find some of it wonderfully suitable in that way only music can be. (more)

The Cathedral of the Madeleine happens to be the home of one of two Catholic elementary choir schools in the United States (here’s the other), so it’s safe to say that he has a fuller understanding of what constitutes liturgical music via lived experience.

My wife also enjoys listening to the local contemporary Christian radio station, and I appreciate the role that this music has played in her life of faith. But she has made no overtures to me about playing any of this repertoire in church, at Mass or otherwise. (Not that I have the final say in matters liturgical, anyway—that’s the pastor’s cross, ultimately.) Moreover, while we’re listening in the car, she will point out theological errors in the lyrics whenever they occur.