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Aristotle A. Esguerra has served in the Diocese of Madison since 2009 as music director at the churches of St. Mary, Pine Bluff and St. Ignatius, Mount Horeb, and as the chant instructor to the Cistercian Nuns of Valley of Our Lady Monastery, Prairie du Sac.
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"As the subject of the language of worship was discussed in the Council hall over the course of several days, I followed the process with great attention, as well as later the various wordings of the Liturgy Constitution until the final vote. I still remember very well how after several radical proposals a Sicilian bishop rose and implored the fathers to allow caution and reason to reign on this point, because otherwise there would be the danger that the entire Mass might be held in the language of the people — whereupon the entire hall burst into uproarious laughter."
— Alfons Cardinal Stickler (1997)

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A Deacon on Devotional and Liturgical Music
published 25 February 2013 by Aristotle A. Esguerra

From a deacon at the Cathedral of the Madeleine in Salt Lake City:

Unlike many of my Catholic friends, I enjoy a fair amount of contemporary Christian music. My enjoyment of such music, by no means all of it, as much of is lamentably bad, has no liturgical implications, which means I have no desire for it to comprise any part of the Sacred Liturgy. But for devotional purposes, I find some of it wonderfully suitable in that way only music can be. (more)

The Cathedral of the Madeleine happens to be the home of one of two Catholic elementary choir schools in the United States (here’s the other), so it’s safe to say that he has a fuller understanding of what constitutes liturgical music via lived experience.

My wife also enjoys listening to the local contemporary Christian radio station, and I appreciate the role that this music has played in her life of faith. But she has made no overtures to me about playing any of this repertoire in church, at Mass or otherwise. (Not that I have the final say in matters liturgical, anyway—that’s the pastor’s cross, ultimately.) Moreover, while we’re listening in the car, she will point out theological errors in the lyrics whenever they occur.