About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“We must say it plainly: the Roman rite as we knew it exists no more. It has gone. Some walls of the structure have fallen, others have been altered—we can look at it as a ruin or as the partial foundation of a new building. Think back, if you remember it, to the Latin sung High Mass with Gregorian chant. Compare it with the modern post-Vatican II Mass. It is not only the words, but also the tunes and even certain actions that are different. In fact it is a different liturgy of the Mass.”
— Fr. Joseph Gelineau (1978)

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PDF Download • “Compline for Sunday”
published 23 April 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

IFTY YEARS AFTER the Second Vatican Council, they are still working on completing the chant books containing the revised “post-conciliar” Breviary. I believe this is one reason Pope Benedict XVI gave every Latin Rite priest permission to fulfill his obligation with the 1962 Breviary: fifty years is just a totally unacceptable period of time. (Several very smart people have told me it will never be completed.)

Speaking of the 1962 Divine Office, we have been asked to sing Compline after Mass tonight. As quickly as possible, I put together the following booklet for the choir. Changes were made to 1957 Compline in 1961. I have tried to take those alterations into consideration, but please let me know about any errors I have made. My ignorance about the 1962 Divine Office is profound!

    * *  PDF Download • Sunday Compline “Eastertide” (1962)

We used the “Te lucis ante terminum” melody my choir knows; the same chosen by Palestrina in the Mass we sing. We are allowed to substitute this melody under the same provisions that allow—for example—using a modern setting of the “Te lucis ante terminum.” Indeed, many parishes use the common tone all year long.