About this blogger:
Andrew Leung is a seminarian for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Steubenville, Ohio. He has served as Director of Music at St. Pius X Church (Atlanta) and taught Gregorian chant at the Cistercian Monastery of the Holy Spirit (Georgia). For two years, he will be studying in Macau, China.
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A lot of the favoured new settings are musically illiterate, almost is if they were written by semi-trained teenagers, getting to grips with musical rudiments. The style is stodgy and sentimental, tonally and rhythmically stilted, melodically inane and adored by Catholic clergy “of a certain age.” Some Catholic dioceses run courses for wannabe composers to perpetuate this style. It is a scandal. People with hardly any training and experience of even the basic building blocks of music have been convinced that there is a place for their puerile stumblings and fumblings in the modern Catholic Church because real musicians are elitist and off-putting.
— James MacMillan (20 November 2013)

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Sistine Chapel Choir has made Great Improvement
published 12 November 2015 by Andrew Leung

FEW WEEKS AGO, Veronica shared on her post about the new CD that the Sistine Chapel Choir is releasing. The CD, Cantate Domino is now available on Deutsche Grammophon and I have just received my CD. I have listened to it more than three times now and I am just amazed by the improvement they have made! You can hear the differences if you compare these two recordings below.

(1) Palestrina’s Reges Tharis et insulae from 2011:



(2) Palestrina’s Sicut Cervus from the 2015 CD:



HE SISTINE CHAPEL CHOIR sounds like a British boys’ choir! The recordings in this CD are definitely the best ones I have ever heard from the Italian choir. The balance, blending and tuning is perfect! This is the first time that the Sistine Chapel has been used for a commercial recording. The music recorded in the CD was written specifically for the Sistine Chapel Choir for papal celebrations. The choir has recorded both Gregorian Chant and polyphonic pieces in this album.

What do you think about this new album? Do you like the way they are singing now? Feel free to leave comments on the Facebook page.