About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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"Impelled by the weightiest of reasons, we are fully determined to restore Latin to its position of honor, and to do all We can to promote its study and use. The employment of Latin has recently been contested in many quarters, and many are asking what the mind of the Apostolic See is in this matter. We have therefore decided to issue the timely directives contained in this document, so as to ensure that the ancient and uninterrupted use of Latin be maintained and, where necessary, restored.”
— Pope John XXIII (22 February 1962)

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The Weirdest Thing About Renaissance Motets
published 22 August 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

ID YOU KNOW Renaissance composers would often include the names of Catholics from the congregation in the actual motets sung at Mass? There are several famous examples, but here’s one which is not so well known:

    * *  PDF Orlando de Lassus “SALVE FESTA DIES

The piece includes the name of a priest named “Reusch” who was celebrating his first Mass:

789 Reuschius


Dr. Peter Bergquist (who taught at the University of Oregon for thirty years) is not sure who that priest might have been:

4489 Reuschius


Can you imagine if the polyphonic choir at my wedding sang the name “Jeff Ostrowski” during the piece? People would have been shocked!

This type of thing was often done by rich people getting married; they would commission a special motet for the occasion. Moreover, the composer would frequently make sure the name was REALLY PROMINENT so nobody would miss it. Pretty weird, huh?