About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and five children.
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“We must say it plainly: the Roman rite as we knew it exists no more. It has gone. Some walls of the structure have fallen, others have been altered—we can look at it as a ruin or as the partial foundation of a new building. Think back, if you remember it, to the Latin sung High Mass with Gregorian chant. Compare it with the modern post-Vatican II Mass. It is not only the words, but also the tunes and even certain actions that are different. In fact it is a different liturgy of the Mass.”
— Fr. Joseph Gelineau (1978)

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Learning the Latin of the Pater Noster
published 29 March 2014 by Veronica Brandt

Pater noster certificate E HAVE to start somewhere. Learning any language can be the work of a lifetime, but that is no reason to put it off indefinitely. When learning more about the history of the liturgy, one can get the impression that everyone has a better understanding of Latin than oneself. That may have varying levels of truth depending on where you hang around, but many people scrape by on the bare minimum or less.

When I’m teaching kids Gregorian chant I try to remember to first go through the meaning of the words. Sometimes I forget, then I wonder why they don’t seem to care. You need to have even just a little bit of understanding to help you love something. You can’t love what you don’t know.

So, the Thursday before last saw my last lesson with my homeschool class on the Latin of the Pater Noster. I’ve made up flashcards, crossword puzzles and a few quizzes along the way. My notes are up at Kidschant.com.

Suggestions are welcome!