About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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A lot of the favoured new settings are musically illiterate, almost is if they were written by semi-trained teenagers, getting to grips with musical rudiments. The style is stodgy and sentimental, tonally and rhythmically stilted, melodically inane and adored by Catholic clergy “of a certain age.” Some Catholic dioceses run courses for wannabe composers to perpetuate this style. It is a scandal. People with hardly any training and experience of even the basic building blocks of music have been convinced that there is a place for their puerile stumblings and fumblings in the modern Catholic Church because real musicians are elitist and off-putting.
— James MacMillan (20 November 2013)

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PDF Download: Tozer Propers & Labouré Propers
published 17 July 2014 by Jeff Ostrowski

248 Tozer Propers VERYBODY TALKS about the Rossini Propers, but I’m a trained musician and I find them horribly-formatted and nearly impossible to sing.   (example page)

Did you know many other composers created easy versions of the complete Mass Proper? Not long ago, we provided a complete organ edition of Propers created in Kansas. Today, we have Propers from England and San Antonio, Texas!

Here’s the collection from Texas, which was very nicely formatted by Fr. Theodore Labouré, and is extremely easy to sing:

      * *  PDF Download: 1922 Labouré Propers

The ones from England (originally published in 1905, not 1934) are choral arrangements, and struck me as very “Protestant-sounding” — which makes sense, I guess, since A. Edmonds Tozer (†1910) was formerly an Anglican:

      * *  PDF Download: 1934 Tozer Propers

Just like the Kansas Propers, these books have never been made available online before today!

I ALWAYS ENJOY SEEING what each composer does with the Sequences. In both cases, they strike me as more difficult than the authentic plainsong versions!

A few quotes from the introductions:

REV. THEODORE LABOURÉ in 1922 : The law of the Church plainly declares that, whenever High Mass is celebrated, the Proper of the Mass must be sung or at least recited. The reason for this is obvious: for it is the Proper and the Proper alone that differentiates one Mass from another — the sadness of Advent and Lent from the joy of Christmas and the triumph of Easter.
AUGUSTUS EDMONDS TOZER in 1905 : This arrangement of the Proprium Missæ for Sundays and Holidays is intended for those choirs who find the plain-chant from the Graduale beyond their powers of execution; and secondarily that those who regularly sing the prescribed melodies, but who may not be able to master everything set down for any particular Mass, may have something at hand which is easily learnt, and of greater musical interest than a mere recitation of the words on a monotone, or even to a psalmtone. It is of obligation to sing the proper Introit, Gradual, Offertory and Communion at every High Mass or Missa Cantata. It is better, then, in the writers opinion, to do well some such simple settings as these, than to labor indifferently through plain-chant, which is often very difficult.

251 Labouré Propers


250 Simple Propers


For the record, the Solesmes simple arrangements (Chants Abrégés) are 1,000x more professional than the Rossini Propers, and both editions—1926 & 1955—are available online.