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"That good youth, recognizing the dangers in which he was involving himself in so perilous a journey, declared at his departure that the desire of serving God was leading him into a country where he surely expected to meet death." — Fr. Jerome Lalemant, speaking of St. Jean de Lalande
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“In spite of what it is currently called, the music of these songs is not modern: this musical style is not new, but has been played in the most profane places and surroundings (cabarets, music halls, often for more or less lascivious dances with foreign names). The people are led on to rock or swing. They all feel an urge to dance about. That sort of “body language” is certainly alien to our Western culture, unfavorable to contemplation and its origins are rather suspect. Most of the time our congregations, which already find it hard not to confuse the crochets and the quavers in a 6/8 bar, do not respect the rhythm; then one no longer feels like dancing, but with the rhythm gone to pieces, the habitual poorness of the melodic line becomes all the more noticeable.”
— Unnamed choirmaster (Northern France) circa 1986

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1880 Les Mélodies Grégoriennes d'après la tradition
published 19 March 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

km0_GCT-tome_1880_Les_Melodies_Gregoriennes_d-apres_la_tradition HE FOLLOWING BOOK has been made available for free download courtesy of the Jean de Lalande Library. If you appreciate these efforts, please consider making a donation by using the link at the top of the page.

      * *  1880 Les Mélodies Grégoriennes d’après la tradition (PDF)

• Les mélodies grégoriennes, d’après la tradition • Abbot Joseph Pothier • French Book : : vii, 268 pages • Par le Rév. Père Dom Joseph Pothier (1835-1923), moine bénédictin de l’abbaye de Solesmes, de la Congrégation de France • 1880 Tournay, Impr. liturgique de Saint Jean L'évangéliste, Desclée Lefebvre • There is as-yet no differentiation between the salicus and scandicus. •