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"Father Isaac Jogues was truly a martyr before God, rendering witness to Heaven and earth that he valued the Faith and the propagation of the gospel more highly than his own life, and losing it in the dangers into which, with full consciousness, he cast himself for Jesus Christ…" — Fr. Jerome Lalemant (writing in 1647)
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"As the subject of the language of worship was discussed in the Council hall over the course of several days, I followed the process with great attention, as well as later the various wordings of the Liturgy Constitution until the final vote. I still remember very well how after several radical proposals a Sicilian bishop rose and implored the fathers to allow caution and reason to reign on this point, because otherwise there would be the danger that the entire Mass might be held in the language of the people — whereupon the entire hall burst into uproarious laughter."
— Alfons Cardinal Stickler (1997)

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Pope Francis Will Canonize Pope John Paul II
published 9 July 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

OPE FRANCIS has authorized the promulgation of a decree from the Congregation for the Causes of Saints, declaring a second miracle attributable to the intercession of Blessed Pope John Paul II.

It seems that John Paul II will be canonized before long. This is (generally speaking) good news for all those who have been in favor of what Josef Cardinal Ratzinger called a “new liturgical movement” and Raymond Cardinal Burke has called the “Reform of the Reform.”

Here’s a quote from JP2:

“Active participation does not preclude the active passivity of silence, stillness and listening: indeed, it demands it. Worshippers are not passive, for instance, when listening to the readings or the homily, or following the prayers of the celebrant, and the chants and music of the liturgy. These are experiences of silence and stillness, but they are in their own way profoundly active. In a culture which neither favors nor fosters meditative quiet, the art of interior listening is learned only with difficulty. Here we see how the liturgy, though it must always be properly inculturated, must also be counter-cultural.”
— Pope John Paul II, 10/9/1998   [source]