About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“I grew up listening to Lessons & Carols from Cambridge and that was Advent-Christmas for me. Then I moved to Rome and discovered Rorate Masses, the Novena of the Immaculate Conception with the Tota Pulchra, the Christmas Novena, the O Antiphons, the Aspiciens, the Rorate Coeli, the Alma Redemptoris Mater: that's Advent for me now. I am glad to see seminarians all over the United States doing Lessons & Carols, but are they learning our ancient Roman traditions alongside a 20th-century Anglican one?”
— Rev. Christopher Smith

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Were You An Altar Boy In The 1960s?
published 23 July 2013 by Jeff Ostrowski

635 Altar Boy ATHOLIC MEN who grew up in the 1960s probably remember struggling to memorize the Confiteor and dreaded Suscipiat so they could serve at the Altar. There were also complex rubrics which required diligent rehearsal (“complex” as far as a young boy is concerned). If you’re reading this article, can you remember those days?

If you answered “yes,” then I have a question for you. What was it like when the Novus Ordo Mass was introduced? Perhaps the priest approached you and said, “Listen, buddy, all the rubrics have been simplified. You don’t need to kneel at the Altar steps anymore. All you need to do is bring up the gifts.” Can anyone remember such a moment?

I realize that what we now refer to as the “Ordinary Form” was gradually introduced. Still, it must have been quite a change for a small boy. Can anyone elaborate?