About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“We must say it plainly: the Roman rite as we knew it exists no more. It has gone. Some walls of the structure have fallen, others have been altered—we can look at it as a ruin or as the partial foundation of a new building. Think back, if you remember it, to the Latin sung High Mass with Gregorian chant. Compare it with the modern post-Vatican II Mass. It is not only the words, but also the tunes and even certain actions that are different. In fact it is a different liturgy of the Mass.”
— Fr. Joseph Gelineau (1978)

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Organ Improvisation • Stupefyingly Awesome!
published 17 July 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

MMEDIATELY AFTER the ALLELUIA by Guerrero, Dr. Horst Buchholz improvises in a marvelous way, based on the “Tu Es Petrus” plainsong theme:


We usually add a short organ piece after the Gospel, when the Subdeacon carries the Evangeliarium to be kissed by the celebrant, who is then incensed, walks to the pulpit, dons his biretta, and so forth.

I don’t know if this is written down “officially” in the rubrics, but the sacred liturgy has always been considered something living. For the record, Fr. Adrian Fortecue allows—in his sensational handwritten book of instructions—organ music at the same place shown in the video:

115 Fortescue Liber Organi


Fortescue doesn’t want it after the Gospel, probably because he never had Solemn High Mass at his parish church.