About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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"Upon the road, René was always occupied with God. His words and the discourses he held were all expressive of submission to the commands of Divine Providence, and showed a willing acceptance of the death which God was sending him. He gave himself to God as a sacrifice, to be reduced to ashes by the fires of the Iroquois, which that good Father's hand would kindle. He sought the means to bless Him in all things and everywhere. Covered with wounds as he himself was, Goupil dressed the wounds of other persons, of the enemies who had received some blows in the fight as well as those of the prisoners. He opened the vein for a sick Iroquois. And he did it all with as much charity as if he had done it to persons who were his best friends."
— St. Isaac Jogues (writing in 1643)

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Brave Schola Director Posts “Live” Recording • Part 2
published 27 April 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

871 Altar Cards Traditional Latin Mass ITHOUT QUESTION, the hardest thing about singing in a choir is also the most beneficial thing. Sooner or later, you must place a recording device near the Altar and find out how your choir actually sounds.

Most people think singing is easy. On paper, it seems easy. In fact, it’s incredibly difficult. Moreover, the first time you record a “live” Mass, you will probably be very discouraged. It’s like having a bucket of cold water thrown in your face. Yet, as I said, there’s nothing more beneficial.

I’ve mentioned in the past that many on the internet love to criticize and pontificate; but these same people are too afraid to post “live” recordings of their choirs (if they even direct a choir). They realize that if they do, people will rip them to shreds. As I said, singing is very difficult. It’s much easier to hide on the internet, disparaging the efforts of others.

Below is a “live” recording of our choir singing at yesterday’s Mass. Coming from immediately after the Consecration, it begins with chant and then launches into Palestrina: 1

    * *  Mp3 Download • “Live” Recording From Last Night

It was recorded by a tiny microphone near the Altar, behind a marble pillar. As you can hear, there are some balance issues, but these can be corrected as time goes on. Our 100% volunteer choir began singing in Advent. Since that time, we’ve never had the same exact group of singers show up two Sundays in a row. This makes it more challenging to correct balance issues, but I’m sure we’ll get there eventually. Our Masses currently happen Sunday evening, and not everyone can attend; but this will change whenever we obtain a Church of our own—we are the newest parish in Los Angeles.

I need to hurry up and continue making progress, because my time as director is limited; eventually the choir will notice I don’t know what I’m doing!



NOTES FROM THIS ARTICLE:

1   The score can be downloaded as a PDF by going to this website; look for the SANCTUS.