About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and six children.
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“Father Daniel’s special work during his stay at Ihonatiria was with the children. Their parents had not trained or disciplined them, they were utterly lawless and bad-tempered, but with infinite forbearance and kindliness the missionary became a favorite with them… Having taught them to sing, he proceeded to train the children to chant the Our Father, the Hail Mary, and the Commandments, which he had rendered into Huron rhymes. Formed into a choir, they added beauty and solemnity to the chapel services and attracted great numbers of their elders to Mass.”
— From the Life of Saint Antoine Daniel (d. 1648)

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What's new with the age old chant?
published 13 July 2013 by Veronica Brandt

REGORIO HAS A WIKI. You can find it over at gregoriochant.org. It has links to the official page, the web interfaces, even our own video tutorials! It promises to be the central place for all those quirky tips and tricks that come up on the mailing lists too. And if you want to check out the mailing lists, the links are at gregoriochant.org.

What is a wiki? The word “wiki” comes from a hawaiian word for quick. It has come to describe a webpage where people can collaborate easily, editing as they go. The idea relies on a bunch of people working together. It is exciting to see people from all over the world on the gregorio mailing lists. The open source software is helping communities everywhere communicate the music of the Church.

The latest development is a new idea for notating the old squiggly neumes known as semiology. The work is in it’s infancy, but you can see the first concepts taking shape here. The picture here shows one sort. There are several types, take Aaron Mack’s photos from Benevento Cathedral for another example. Now, I am not a semiology sort or person, but the idea of little squiggles instead of the four lines has some appeal, especially dealing with choir members who don’t read music. Perhaps pointing psalms with squiggly neumes might be easier for the musically illiterate.