About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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"The Consilium is merely an assembly of people, many of them incompetent, and others well advanced on the road to novelty. The discussions are extremely hurried. Discussions are based on impressions and the voting is chaotic. […] Many of those who have influenced the reform […] have no love, and no veneration of that which has been handed down to us. They begin by despising everything that is actually there. This negative mentality is unjust and pernicious, and unfortunately, Paul VI tends a little to this side. They have all the best intentions, but with this mentality they have only been able to demolish and not to restore."
— Contemporary account of the Consilium by Cardinal Antonelli

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Learn A New Word, See It Within 24 Hours (5)
published 7 May 2012 by Jeff Ostrowski

I’ve written about this subject before, here, here, here, and here. Whenever one learns a new word or talks about an odd subject, one will see it again “out of the blue” within 24 hours. This used to happen to me once a month. Now it seems to happen all the time. It can be something relatively common (like a random Star Wars excerpt or particulars of skateboarding) that manifests itself within 24 hours, or it can be even more bizarre. Perhaps this will become more clear if I describe a recent example:

Anyone who has seen My Fair Lady remembers how the father of Eliza Doolittle talks. He has a funny way of speaking. Note carefully these famous lines of his:

“I ain’t pretendin’ to be deservin’. No, I’m undeservin’ . . . and I mean to go on being undeservin’. I like it and that’s the truth. But will you take advantage of a man’s nature? . . . Do him out of the price of his own daughter, what he’s brought up, fed and clothed by the sweat of his brow?”

Obviously, Mr. Doolittle should have said “whom he’s brought up” not “what he’s brought up.”

So, a few days ago, I started asking myself, “What would it be like if we all spoke as Eliza Doolittle’s father?” A question like this: «Are there any Germans working here?» would change to: «Are there any Germans what work here?» A statement like this: «Good things come to those who wait.» would become: «Good things come to them what wait.» A proverb like this: «There is danger for him who taketh the tiger cub, and danger also for whoso snatches a delusion from a woman.» would now read as: «There is danger for him who taketh the tiger cub, and danger also for him what snatches a delusion from a woman.» A sentence like this: «Wouldn’t you think I’m the girl … the girl who has everything?» would change to «Wouldn’t you think I’m the girl … the girl what has everything?»

Almost like clockwork, what do I come accross later that very day, while reading a little Sherlock Holmes?