About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“Partly on account of these alterations, and partly because I have been unable to ascertain the authorship of many compositions—which have come to me either in manuscript or through other collections—I have thought it right to publish the volume without appending the names of writers to their works. This, however, I confess to be a defect…”
— Benjamin Hall Kennedy (1863)

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Rehearsal videos • Missa “Ave Maris Stella” (Victoria)
published 22 May 2018 by Jeff Ostrowski

ATHER Tomás Luis de Victoria’s Missa Ave Maris Stella will be sung at the final Mass of the Sacred Music Symposium. CCWatershed has commissioned rehearsal videos for everything that will be sung—but not all participants utilize them. Some prefer to learn their music by singing through the parts silently in their head. 1 Others use the piano. All methods are perfectly acceptable, because each participant has a different level of expertise. By the way, there are still a few spots available; we have currently accepted 75.

Over the next few months, I will release all the rehearsal videos.

Today, we begin with the Kyrie:


REHEARSAL VIDEOS for each individual voice and PDF score await you at #89425.

Many readers won’t click on that link (#89425)—depriving themselves of the PDF score. I’m saddened by this.

Other readers will avoid clicking that link (#89425)—and consequently miss the opportunity to have fun singing along with individual voice parts.

THOSE WHO ATTEND Sacred Music Symposium 2018 will be taught how we make rehearsal videos such as the one above. They will also have an opportunity to meet Fr. Josef Bisig, a truly legendary figure in the Catholic Church. They will also sing Solemn Vespers each night. These are just some of the marvelous opportunities found at the Symposium.



NOTES FROM THIS ARTICLE:

1   For myself, I don’t use recordings to learn music. Neither did most of the people who studied at the Conservatory with me. Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms I learned sitting in a doctor’s office—and I would not have been able to sight-read a chromatic piece like that. However, I suspect some of our readers could perform even a difficult piece like that instantly, without looking in advance. Each person has a different level of skill. The logical approach is to accept this…and plan accordingly.