About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he lives with his wife and two children.
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“As the subject of the language of worship was discussed in the Council hall over the course of several days, I followed the process with great attention, as well as later the various wordings of the Liturgy Constitution until the final vote. I still remember very well how after several radical proposals a Sicilian bishop rose and implored the fathers to allow caution and reason to reign on this point, because otherwise there would be the danger that the entire Mass might be held in the language of the people-whereupon the entire hall burst into uproarious laughter.”
— Alfons Cardinal Stickler, peritus of Vatican II

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“Vidimus Stellam Ejus In Oriente”
published 20 June 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

OMETIMES WE ENCOUNTER people who put too much of their imagination into interpreting music. On the other hand, certain things seem to me undeniable. For example, Fr. Cristóbal de Morales often has a strange Tritone relationship before the word “crucifixus,” to symbolize the “dissonance” of hanging God on a cross. Then, too, Morales frequently makes his point of imitation in the very shape of a cross at the “crucifixus” section. Francisco Guerrero, a student of Morales, was outstanding in his text painting.

I’m often skeptical of “text painting” claims. People will say, “Oh, the melody descends, so that means such-and-such.” But many melodies descend, and it means nothing! On the other hand, who would deny the text painting on the word REVÓLVIT?

431 rolled stone text painting Gregorian


If you examine the Communion for Epiphany (“Vidimus stellam ejus”), there seems to be an attempt at text painting on the word ORIÉNTE:

432 Vidimus


The composer (or later editor) might be trying to give an “oriental” flavor to those words, and the best way he could think to do so is a Tritone. For the record, “ad Oriéntem” occurs in the Communion for Ascension Thursday, and a similar figuration was used.