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"That good youth, recognizing the dangers in which he was involving himself in so perilous a journey, declared at his departure that the desire of serving God was leading him into a country where he surely expected to meet death." — Fr. Jerome Lalemant, speaking of St. Jean de Lalande
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Two pages of modal exercises reflect Liszt’s lively theoretical curiosity. On those pages he analysed the construction, transpositions, and “points of repose” of several modes, copied out several types of tetrachords, and jotted down several definitions of the effects and characters of certain modes. {…} Modality was not the only element of Gregorian chant that intrigued Liszt. Rhythm too was the object of his “studies.” He also copied out plainchant melodies using modern instead of square notation. In his letter from July 24, 1860, to Carolyne, Liszt refers to the necessity of this “modern” practice.
— Nicolas Dufetel on Franz Liszt's interest in plainsong

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1891 Dom Joseph Pothier Antiphonale
published 19 March 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

km0_misc-tome_1891_Pothier_Antiphonale HE FOLLOWING BOOK has been made available for free download courtesy of the Jean de Lalande Library. If you appreciate these efforts, please consider making a donation by using the link at the top of the page.

      * *  1891 Pothier “Liber Antiphonarius” (PDF)

• Liber antiphonarius pro diurnis horis : Juxta ritum monasticum kalendario proprio Congregationis Gallicae ordinis Sancti Benedicti accommodatus. • xix, 1053, 9, 7, [1] pages • 1891 Solesmis : e Typographeo Sancti Petri, • Pothier’s 1891 Monastic Antiphonale. • Abbot Pothier •