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"Father Antoine Daniel was a man of great courage and endurance, whose gentle kindness was conspicuous among his great virtues. […] Verily, he burned with a zeal for God more intense than any flame that consumed his body." — Fr. Paul Ragueneau
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“…I started down the road of the liturgy, and this became a continuous process of growth into a grand reality transcending all particular individuals and generations, a reality that became an occasion for me of ever-new amazement and discovery. The incredible reality of the Catholic liturgy has accompanied me through all phases of life, and so I shall have to speak of it time and again.”
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Gather Hymnal Vs. Gregorian Chant
published 19 June 2013 by Corpus Christi Watershed

OST PEOPLE REALIZE that Gregorian chant was often sung from large scores during the Middle Ages, since paper was so hard to come by. Some conductors still use this technique, as it tends to help choirs sing “together” — musicians understand what it means for a choir to sing, breathe, feel, and think together. Here is Dr. William Mahrt:


However, GIA’s Gather Hymnal performed this way does not seem to possess the same charm, possibly because Gather contains so little Gregorian chant, as opposed to newer Catholic publications like the Vatican hymnal:

AS MANY HAVE POINTED OUT in the past, most of the major “hymnals” (Gather, Glory & Praise, JourneySongs) should not be called “hymnals.” They are songbooks. They are books containing (mostly) songs. How can you tell the difference between a song and a hymn? If it requires accompaniment, has extremely long note values and rests, emphasizes vague notions of “gathering,” and sounds like it could be used in a Disney movie, it’s most likely a song.