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Andrew Motyka is the Archdiocesan Director of Liturgical Music and Cathedral Music for the Archdiocese of Indianapolis.
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“Each Mass contains the slaying of the Victim, not repeated here in the West after centuries, made once only long ago in Palestine, yet part of the sacrifice offered throughout the world each morning. All Masses are one sacrifice, including the death of the cross, continuing through all time the act of offering then begun … Every time we hear Mass we look across that gulf of time, we are again before the cross, with his mother and St. John; we offer still that victim then slain, present here under the forms of bread and wine.”
— Fr. Adrian Fortescue (d. 1923)

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Just Pick Up a Pencil and Do It.
published 17 April 2013 by Andrew R. Motyka

've met several writers in my lifetime, some successful, some not. What the successful ones have in common is that they write every day.

Musicians should take this hint. How many of us practice our instruments every day, but never pick up a pencil and write something? Sure, we say to ourselves, “I wish I were gifted enough to write something beautiful like Composer X,” but that’s because we don’t even try.

Just do it. Write something, even something short. This is where writing psalm responses or (ahem) communion antiphons comes in handy. It’s great practice. Sure, you probably won’t use half of what you put down, and sometimes will revise it a dozen times, but it’s important to just try it. You’ll get better, just as you get better at playing the organ, singing, or conducting.

It will take time before it is worthy of the liturgy, but it’s important to try. The Church needs better composers, and if all you do is wait for the latest music from (Insert Major Publisher Here), the music will be as stagnant and vacuous as we’ve seen for decades now. Get in the game.