About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“More and more as we grow older, we find that the people we see most of are recent acquaintances; not (perhaps) very congenial to us, but chance has thrown them in our way. Meanwhile, the people we used to know so well—for whom we once entertained such warm feelings—are now remembered by a card at Christmas (if we can succeed in finding the address). How good we are at making friends, when we are young; how bad at keeping them! How eagerly, as we grow older, do we treasure up the friendships that are left to us, like beasts that creep together for warmth!”
— Msgr. Ronald Knox (1888-1957)

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Josquin Des Prez Vandalized Stuff (!)
published 26 October 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

4121 arguam HEN I WAS STUDYING musicology in graduate school, the professor hurried into class one day and exclaimed gleefully: “Josquin vandalized things!”

Then she spoke of an article she read which described how someone discovered Josquin’s name “etched onto the back of a pew, proving he was a singer at the Vatican.” At that time, I wondered how we could be certain it was Josquin des Prez (d. 1521) who created the vandalism and not somebody else. (But I admit it’s more fun to assume it to be authentic and not a forgery!)

My professor must have been talking about marker 1:12 in this stunningly well-produced video:


Unfortunately, that’s pretty much all I remember from graduate studies!

P.S.

Sometimes it’s hard to remember the famous Renaissance composers were not hired as such—they were hired as singers.

Sorry to change subjects, and sorry to be random, but I discovered something yesterday. It turns out Ted Marier was not infallible. Examine carefully the bottom of this page:

4120 MARIER


Marier says the translation was by “anonymous”—but unless I’m mistaken, this translation was produced by Fr. Caswall.