About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and five children.
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"As the subject of the language of worship was discussed in the Council hall over the course of several days, I followed the process with great attention, as well as later the various wordings of the Liturgy Constitution until the final vote. I still remember very well how after several radical proposals a Sicilian bishop rose and implored the fathers to allow caution and reason to reign on this point, because otherwise there would be the danger that the entire Mass might be held in the language of the people — whereupon the entire hall burst into uproarious laughter."
— Alfons Cardinal Stickler (1997)

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Christus Vincit - Christ Conquers
published 14 October 2017 by Veronica Brandt

Christ, Aquinas and Newman BOUT THIS TIME LAST YEAR I wrote about Christus Vincit a.k.a. Laudes Regiae. It’s still a favorite piece and a great antidote to the malady of thinking chant is dull – a condition affecting all too many Catholics arising from insufficient exposure to chant well sung.

Christus Vincit is also famous as the interval signal for Vatican Radio – a much shorter piece than the full Laudes Regiae from the time of King Charlemagne, but still a great piece to have in your repertoire for all sorts of occasions.

In my earlier post I included two versions of Christus Vincit. This time I include the Tonus Simplex version from the Cantuale Romano-Seraphicum:

Christus Vincit Simplex

I can’t see any recordings – it’s almost metrical, and yet not quite. The Cantuale sets it as an Antiphon with Laudate Dominum omnes gentes as the psalm in mode 6 – as you might be familiar with from Adoremus in aeternum.