About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and six children.
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A second class of tunes—which can also be said with certainty to fall under the profane—are those which are written in the style of secular songs and which, if heard without the words, would be recognized only as such. In these, as a rule, the devotional gives way to the sentimental, cheerfulness to levity and oftentimes vulgarity, while not even an attempt is made to give a serious or dignified musical expression to the sentiments embodied in the words of the hymn. Not the least objectionable feature of some of these tunes is a jingling piano accompaniment quite unsuited to the church organ.
— Preface to a Roman Catholic Hymnal (1896)

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Christus Vincit - Christ Conquers
published 14 October 2017 by Veronica Brandt

Christ, Aquinas and Newman BOUT THIS TIME LAST YEAR I wrote about Christus Vincit a.k.a. Laudes Regiae. It’s still a favorite piece and a great antidote to the malady of thinking chant is dull – a condition affecting all too many Catholics arising from insufficient exposure to chant well sung.

Christus Vincit is also famous as the interval signal for Vatican Radio – a much shorter piece than the full Laudes Regiae from the time of King Charlemagne, but still a great piece to have in your repertoire for all sorts of occasions.

In my earlier post I included two versions of Christus Vincit. This time I include the Tonus Simplex version from the Cantuale Romano-Seraphicum:

Christus Vincit Simplex

I can’t see any recordings – it’s almost metrical, and yet not quite. The Cantuale sets it as an Antiphon with Laudate Dominum omnes gentes as the psalm in mode 6 – as you might be familiar with from Adoremus in aeternum.