About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“One would be straying from the straight path were he to wish the altar restored to its primitive table form; were he to want black excluded as a color for the liturgical vestments; were he to forbid the use of sacred images and statues in Churches; were he to order the crucifix so designed that the divine Redeemer's body shows no trace of His cruel sufferings; and lastly were he to disdain and reject polyphonic music or singing in parts, even where it conforms to regulations issued by the Holy See.”
— Ven. Pope Pius XII (20 November 1947)

Fulton J. Sheen • “Hints On Public Speaking”
published 10 November 2017 by Jeff Ostrowski

3990 ARCHBISHOP FULTON J SHEEN OMEONE NAMED Thomas C. Reeves wrote a biography of Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen entitled: America’s Bishop: The Life and Times of Fulton J. Sheen. I can’t recommend purchasing that book because of its serious flaws. 1

However, here’s something I actually liked:

    * *  Hints on Public Speaking (Fulton J. Sheen)

We choirmasters are often called upon to speak in public, so I thought readers would enjoy this. I started giving public presentations while still in college, at venues such as Washburn University. My first attempts were pretty horrible, but that’s okay because I learned a ton.

First Bonus :

Check out this 1935 letter sent by Bishop Schlarman on Sheen’s behalf.

Second Bonus :

Check out this nifty photograph of Sheen with Ratzinger.


1   For example, much of it is nothing more than a rehash of Sheen’s autobiography. The citations are laid out very poorly (perhaps by design). Moreover, Mr. Reeves often attempts to “fact check” things about Sheen’s early life, but makes foolish errors in the process. The commentary on “the times” could best be described as simpleminded. Perhaps I should publish a full-fledged review of the book…but that strikes me as a waste of time.