About this blogger:
Veronica Brandt holds a Bachelor Degree in Electrical Engineering. As editor, she has produced fine publications (as well as valuable reprints) dealing with Gregorian chant, hymnody, Latin, and other subjects. These publications are distinguished on account of their tastefulness. She lives in the Blue Mountains near Sydney, Australia, with her husband Peter and five children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“I vividly remember going to church with him in Bournemouth. He was a devout Roman Catholic and it was soon after the Church had changed the liturgy (from Latin to English). My grandfather obviously didn't agree with this and made all the responses very loudly in Latin while the rest of the congregation answered in English. I found the whole experience quite excruciating, but my grandfather was oblivious. He simply had to do what he believed to be right.”
— Simon Tolkien (2003)

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Compline Online with Chant Notation
published 22 October 2016 by Veronica Brandt

Compline by Benjamin Bloomfield IGHT PRAYER OR COMPLINE makes a beautiful end to the day, invoking special blessings for the night as well as a reminder for a daily examination of conscience.

It’s also one of the simplest hours of the Divine Office or Liturgy of the Hours. You can imagine people tended to keep things simple at the end of a long day when it might be hard to keep one’s eyes open. Another reason may be that it could be prayed from memory in the dark.

Last week, browsing through repositories on Github, I stumbled across a beautiful rendering of Compline from the maker of the GABC Transcription Tool.

    * *  Compline thanks to Benjamin Bloomfield

I’m looking forward to sifting through the source code and seeing just how he manages to render the square notes and dynamically adjust linebreaks depending on the size of the browser window.

At home we rely on printed booklets to sing Compline together. These are also available via Github. Having the translation helps, though I’m not sure how one might add it to the browser based compline above without spoiling the layout. A universal familiarity with Latin would make liturgical booklet printing so much easier!