About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“The Church, no doubt, has always kept, and wishes still to maintain everywhere, the language of her Liturgy; and, before the sad and violent changes of the sixteenth century, this eloquent and effective symbol of unity of faith and communion of the faithful was, as you know, cherished in England not less than elsewhere. But this has never been regarded by the Holy See as incompatible with the use of popular hymns in the language of each country. Such hymns, moreover, are useful to familiarize the people with the great truths of faith, and to keep alive their devotion.”
— LEO XIII, POPE (8 June 1898)

ABOUT US  |  OUR HEADER  |  ARCHIVE
Blast From The Past!
published 15 May 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

NE OF MY DEAR FRIENDS sent me photographs taken sixteen years ago. Here’s how the Latin Mass looked in those days:

503 liturgical torchbearers lanterns


In my college years, I carved several sets of liturgical torches. The following images show how they came out:


My torches had a fatal flaw. Being made of wood, several of them caught on fire! We hope to find someone here in Los Angeles who knows how to work with metal. We need to create new torches, made from metal with colored glass. The final product would look something like this:


If you’re like me, you tend to look down on old projects. This is certainly the case with my first sets of torches, which I made circa 2000. However, I have to admit that—as seen in the following photo from our 2007 wedding—the torches I created were not that terrible:

496 Catholic Mass Torchbearers


… but we still want metal ones for Los Angeles!