About this blogger:
Andrew Leung is a seminarian for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Steubenville, Ohio. He has served as Director of Music at St. Pius X Church (Atlanta) and taught Gregorian chant at the Cistercian Monastery of the Holy Spirit (Georgia). For two years, he will be studying in Macau, China.
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“In spite of what it is currently called, the music of these songs is not modem: this musical style is not new, but has been played in the most profane places and surroundings (cabarets, music halls, often for more or less lascivious dances with foreign names). The people are led on to rock or swing. They all feel an urge to dance about. That sort of “body language” is certainly alien to our Western culture, unfavorable to contemplation and its origins are rather suspect. Most of the time our congregations, which already find it hard not to confuse the crochets and the quavers in a 6/8 bar, do not respect the rhythm; then one no longer feels like dancing, but with the rhythm gone to pieces, the habitual poorness of the melodic line becomes all the more noticeable.”
— Unnamed choirmaster (Northern France) circa 1986

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Funeral March for Jesus
published 25 March 2016 by Andrew Leung

HE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF MACAU has a Good Friday tradition: a funeral procession through the streets with a statue of the dead body of Christ. The procession of this year was led by the new bishop of Macau, Bishop Stephen Lee. Bishop Lee who led the march wearing the traditional black vestment was a priest of the Personal Prelature of Opus Dei. He was my first spiritual director and was installed on the Feast of Candlemas this year. Here are two short videos of the procession accompanied by the band of the Macau Police Force.



I am not sure about the origin of this tradition. Maybe some of our readers can help me out and share with us more about this Good Friday custom on our Facebook page. Since Macau was a colony of Portugal, my guess is that this might be a Portuguese or Spanish custom. The procession begins right after the three o’clock Good Friday Service and it obviously symbolizes the burial of Christ. Anyway, I thought this procession is a very good devotion and a great way to evangelize.