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Dale uses an Italian name on every possible occasion… […] In Dale, you do not bow to the celebrant, you “proceed to make the customary salutation”; you do not stand, you “retain a standing posture.” Everyone “observes” to do everything: you observe not to kneel, you observe to retain a kneeling posture. The MC does not tell a man to do a thing, he apprizes him that it should he performed. The celebrant “terminates” the creed; he genuflects in conjunction with the sacred ministers—then he observes to assume a standing posture in conjunction with them. The MC goes about apprizing and comporting himself till he observes to perform the customary salutation. The subdeacon imparts the Pax in the same manner as it was communicated to him. Everyone exhibits a grave deportment; Imagine anyone talking like this. Imagine anyone saying that you ought to exhibit a deportment.
— Fr Adrian Fortescue

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Rev’d Fr. Adrian Fortescue (1874-1923)
published 2 July 2016 by Corpus Christi Watershed


T WAS AS FOOLISH A MISTAKE to judge poetry of the fourth and following centuries by the rules of the Augustan age as it would be to try to tinker prose written in one language, to make it conform with the grammar of another. There are cases where these seventeenth-century Jesuits did not even know the rules of their own grammar books. In “Conditor alme siderum” they changed lines which are perfectly correct by quantity.
—Fr. Adrian Fortescue


260 Fr. Adrian Fortescue


According to Michael Davies:

On one occasion, Fr. Fortescue was engaged in a hand-to-hand struggle with some fanatical Albanian soldiers at Hebron, and he and his companions had to fight their way with bludgeons to their horses and gallop away—in Adrian’s case with a broken collarbone. On a second occasion the caravan with which he was travelling in Asia Minor, disguised as an Arab, was attacked by brigands, and in self-defense he killed an assailant with a pistol shot.