About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“In all this mediaeval religious poetry there is much that we could not use now. Many of the hymns are quite bad, many are frigid compositions containing futile tricks, puns, misinterpreted quotations of Scripture, and twisted concepts, whose only point is their twist. But there is an amazing amount of beautiful poetry that we could still use. If we are to have vernacular hymns at all, why do we not have translations of the old ones?”
— Fr. Adrian Fortescue (d. 1923)

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Chosen Your Easter Alleluia Yet?
published 26 January 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

HE CHOIR HERE in Los Angeles usually sings the Gradual to a mode VIII psalm tone, mixing it with a polyphonic “Alleluia.” Below is a sumptuous setting by Francisco Guerrero (d. 1599), a marvelous composer who lived a very interesting life:

    * *  PDF Download • “ALLELUIA” for the Blessed Virgin (Guerrero)


When Guerrero was alive, the Gradual & Alleluia may have been sung in plainsong, but I suspect many Cathedrals also employed falsobordone, as they did for breviary psalm verses. The Alleluia in that video originally had a different text. 1

REHEARSAL VIDEOS :

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

SOPRANO : YouTube   •   Audio

ALTO : YouTube   •   Audio

TENOR : YouTube   •   Audio

BASS : YouTube   •   Audio



NOTES FROM THIS ARTICLE:

1   When the text is changed, it’s called “contrafactum.”