About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“Sacred music, being a complementary part of the solemn liturgy, participates in the general scope of the liturgy, which is the glory of God and the sanctification and edification of the faithful. It contributes to the decorum and the splendor of the ecclesiastical ceremonies, and since its principal office is to clothe with suitable melody the liturgical text proposed for the understanding of the faithful, its proper aim is to add greater efficacy to the text, in order that through it the faithful may be the more easily moved to devotion and better disposed for the reception of the fruits of grace belonging to the celebration of the most holy mysteries.”
— Pope Saint Pius X

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Chosen Your Easter Alleluia Yet?
published 26 January 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

HE CHOIR HERE in Los Angeles usually sings the Gradual to a mode VIII psalm tone, mixing it with a polyphonic “Alleluia.” Below is a sumptuous setting by Francisco Guerrero (d. 1599), a marvelous composer who lived a very interesting life:

    * *  PDF Download • “ALLELUIA” for the Blessed Virgin (Guerrero)


When Guerrero was alive, the Gradual & Alleluia may have been sung in plainsong, but I suspect many Cathedrals also employed falsobordone, as they did for breviary psalm verses. The Alleluia in that video originally had a different text. 1

REHEARSAL VIDEOS :

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

SOPRANO : YouTube   •   Audio

ALTO : YouTube   •   Audio

TENOR : YouTube   •   Audio

BASS : YouTube   •   Audio



NOTES FROM THIS ARTICLE:

1   When the text is changed, it’s called “contrafactum.”