About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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That the Mass is the central feature of the Catholic religion hardly needs to be said. During the Reformation (and always) the Mass has been the test. The word of the Reformers—“It is the Mass that matters”—was true. The long persecution of Catholics in England took the practical form of laws chiefly against saying Mass; for centuries the occupant of the English throne was obliged to manifest his Protestantism, not by a general denial of the whole system of Catholic dogma, but by a formal repudiation of the doctrine of Transubstantiation and of the Mass.
— Fr. Adrian Fortescue (d. 1923)

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“Credo for Two Voices” • Gustaaf Nees (d. 1965)
published 15 February 2016 by Jeff Ostrowski

HE SOUND OF A MELODY sung in unison an octave apart was not admired by the ancients. Personally, I don’t care for it, so whenever my choir sings plainsong, either all the men sing or all the women sing—or they alternate. I’m sure others will disagree. (After all, we musicians disagree constantly; and we do so with passion!) For the record, I can tolerate that sonority under certain circumstances. 1

The following setting of the Nicene Creed adds a simple men’s countermelody:

    * *  PDF Download • CREDO IV FOR TWO VOICES — Gustaaf Nees (d. 1965)


We usually have a soloist sing the odd verses (starting with “Patrem omnipotentem”) and full choir sing the even verses (starting with “Et in unum Dominum”).

REHEARSAL VIDEOS :

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

WOMEN : YouTube   •   Audio

MEN : YouTube   •   Audio




NOTES FROM THIS ARTICLE:

1   For example, my ears can tolerate men & women singing plainsong an octave apart when a nice organ accompaniment is employed.