About this blogger:
Andrew Leung is a seminarian for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Steubenville, Ohio. He has served as Director of Music at St. Pius X Church (Atlanta) and taught Gregorian chant at the Cistercian Monastery of the Holy Spirit (Georgia). For two years, he will be studying in Macau, China.
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"And since it is becoming that holy things be administered in a holy manner, and of all things this sacrifice is the most holy, the Catholic Church, to the end that it might be worthily and reverently offered and received, instituted many centuries ago the holy canon, which is so free from error that it contains nothing that does not in the highest degree savor of a certain holiness and piety and raise up to God the minds of those who offer."
— Council of Trent (1562)

Papal Liturgies - Day 3 of the Papal Visit
published 24 September 2015 by Andrew Leung

On Day 3 of Pope Francis’s apostolic visit, he celebrated Solemn Vespers at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City. This New York cathedral is a great piece of art, especially after the recent renovation. And the musicians of the cathedral did some beautiful and true Sacred Music under the direction of Dr. Jennifer Pascual.

Reception of the Holy Father: 10:10
Solemn Vespers: 21:00

The New York cathedral set a very good example of Liturgical Music. It is definitely a huge contrast comparing to the two public liturgies yesterday. The Mass last night really doesn’t even worth mentioning, but St. Patrick’s Cathedral seems to have the solutions to the five problems I mentioned on the post yesterday. Even though the cantor sings a little slow sometimes, but unlike the cantors of the National Shrine, he didn’t have a big smile nor did he make a lot eye-contact with the congregation. The music is also very different from the mid-day prayer yesterday, the music selection of the Vespers is very up-lifting and solemn. From the music, you can hear the importance of the person visiting. After all, the Pope is the Vicar of Christ on earth. Too bad they cut off the end of Beethoven’s Hallelujah.