About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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“The Church, no doubt, has always kept, and wishes still to maintain everywhere, the language of her Liturgy; and, before the sad and violent changes of the sixteenth century, this eloquent and effective symbol of unity of faith and communion of the faithful was, as you know, cherished in England not less than elsewhere. But this has never been regarded by the Holy See as incompatible with the use of popular hymns in the language of each country. Such hymns, moreover, are useful to familiarize the people with the great truths of faith, and to keep alive their devotion.”
— LEO XIII, POPE (8 June 1898)

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“Omnes Gentes Plaudite” • Sequence For Ascension
published 13 May 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

HE ANCIENT MANUSCRIPTS are full of the most gorgeous artwork imaginable. For instance, how can these examples be outdone?


Now, check out this picture from the SEQUENCE FOR THE ASCENSION (abolished by Trent):

778 DETAIL Ascension Sequence


When you read the translation, you’ll understand why they chose that exact spot:

772 Omnes Gentes Plaudite


Courtesy of the Musica Sacra Forum, Chris McAvoy has provided the chant notation (01 02).

By the way, you can download 7,055 pages of jaw-dropping liturgical manuscripts courtesy of the Heinrich Heine museum.