About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
Connect on Facebook:
Connect on Twitter:
“From six in the evening, his martyrdom had continued through the ghastly night until nine o'clock in the morning. After fifteen hours of torture rarely if ever surpassed in the bloody annals of the Iroquois, the soul of Gabriel Lalemant was freed from its charred and mutilated prison and summoned to join his comrade Jean de Brébeuf in the radiant splendor of God. March 17th, 1649, was the date; for Brébeuf it had been the sixteenth.”
— Fr. John A. O'Brien, speaking of St. Gabriel Lalemant

PDF Download • “Gloria In Excelsis” With 3-Voice Polyphony By Cristóbal De Morales
published 24 June 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

606 Mediaeval Manuscript IMAGE E HAVE recently been singing polyphony for three voices—whereas most choirs focus on SATB—and I’ve been extremely pleased with the results. Could this have something to do with how each vocal line sounds so “pure” in music written for three parts? Perhaps.

Here’s a lovely setting of the GLORIA which twice breaks into polyphony for three voices. A short excerpt demonstrates this:

    * *  Mp3 File • Short Excerpt (3 voices)

Once your choir knows the piece, encourage them to read directly from the 15th-century notation—included in the following PDF—because this often heightens musicality:

    * *  PDF Download • GLORIA II with Polyphony by Morales

For years, Gloria II struck me “dark,” but eventually it became one of my favorites.

Rehearsal files:

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

HIGHEST : YouTube   •   Audio

MIDDLE : YouTube   •   Audio

LOWEST : YouTube   •   Audio