About this blogger:
A theorist, organist, and conductor, Jeff Ostrowski holds his B.M. in Music Theory from the University of Kansas (2004), and did graduate work in Musicology. He serves as choirmaster for the new FSSP parish in Los Angeles, where he resides with his wife and children.
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"As the subject of the language of worship was discussed in the Council hall over the course of several days, I followed the process with great attention, as well as later the various wordings of the Liturgy Constitution until the final vote. I still remember very well how after several radical proposals a Sicilian bishop rose and implored the fathers to allow caution and reason to reign on this point, because otherwise there would be the danger that the entire Mass might be held in the language of the people — whereupon the entire hall burst into uproarious laughter."
— Alfons Cardinal Stickler (1997)

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PDF Download • “Gloria In Excelsis” With 3-Voice Polyphony By Cristóbal De Morales
published 24 June 2015 by Jeff Ostrowski

606 Mediaeval Manuscript IMAGE E HAVE recently been singing polyphony for three voices—whereas most choirs focus on SATB—and I’ve been extremely pleased with the results. Could this have something to do with how each vocal line sounds so “pure” in music written for three parts? Perhaps.

Here’s a lovely setting of the GLORIA which twice breaks into polyphony for three voices. A short excerpt demonstrates this:

    * *  Mp3 File • Short Excerpt (3 voices)

Once your choir knows the piece, encourage them to read directly from the 15th-century notation—included in the following PDF—because this often heightens musicality:

    * *  PDF Download • GLORIA II with Polyphony by Morales

For years, Gloria II struck me “dark,” but eventually it became one of my favorites.

Rehearsal files:

EQUAL VOICES : YouTube   •   Mp3 Audio

HIGHEST : YouTube   •   Audio

MIDDLE : YouTube   •   Audio

LOWEST : YouTube   •   Audio