About this blogger:
Renowned as composer, conductor, theorist, author, pedagogue, and organist, Aurelio Porfiri has served the Church on multiple continents at the highest levels. Born and raised in Italy, he currently serves as Director of Choral Activities and Composer in Residence for Santa Rosa de Lima School (Macao, China).
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"Upon the road, René was always occupied with God. His words and the discourses he held were all expressive of submission to the commands of Divine Providence, and showed a willing acceptance of the death which God was sending him. He gave himself to God as a sacrifice, to be reduced to ashes by the fires of the Iroquois, which that good Father's hand would kindle. He sought the means to bless Him in all things and everywhere. Covered with wounds as he himself was, Goupil dressed the wounds of other persons, of the enemies who had received some blows in the fight as well as those of the prisoners. He opened the vein for a sick Iroquois. And he did it all with as much charity as if he had done it to persons who were his best friends."
— St. Isaac Jogues (writing in 1643)

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Optimists & Pessimists
published 13 June 2015 by Aurelio Porfiri

631 Aurelio Porfiri WONDER WHY people think I’m too pessimistic about the situation of liturgical music. The problem is not Novus or Vetus Ordo; the problem is that the standard has changed. I will always remember one of my venerated teachers telling me that—of course—in the past also they were doing weird things in Church. Chronicles also exist which tell us about some strange music performed during the liturgy.

But what was the difference? There was a standard commonly accepted, so what was strange and “out of place” was perceived as such. Today it’s not. Today everything can be accepted because competence and good skills are replaced, in the eyes of up-to-date pastoral ministers with good intentions. I’ve already mentioned on many occasions the common sense of people saying that hell is paved with good intentions.

I am optimist in one sense; that we have the energy, resources, and talents to make the liturgy as splendid as it deserves. But my optimism turns to pessimism when I recognize that all these energies, resources, and talents—because of the lack of discernment—are basically flowing in a vacuum.

More articles by Aurelio Porfiri can be found on The Castaway.